Das Racist Music Podcast | Temporary Fandoms - Temporary Fandoms

Episode 35

full
Published on:

9th Sep 2021

Das Racist

There's more than just Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell.

In the final episode of Season Three we look at the short but complex, fun, witty, and memorable work of Das Racist. You might know them from the Pizza Hut and Taco Bell song but there is more to unpack.

We talk about lyrics, mixtapes, what a mixtape actually is, getting drunk on couches, midwestern basements, the amazing post-Das Racist collaborative work with Riz Ahmed "The Swet Shop Boys", and generally talk about a bunch of random things in a ramshackle way. Which kind of works for Das Racist.

Nick and Ewan are rejoined for this episode by the wonderful Brendan Quigley, and Emily Baldoni.

And you can also discover if, like Ewan, you were pronouncing their name wrong.

Contents:

Album introductions with Brendan Quigley

Roundtable chat

Shut up Dude

Sit Down Man

Relax

Swet Shop Boys

As usual there's a Spotify playlist incorporating the podcast and selected songs which you can find at https://sptfy.com/tfdr

The Guests:

Our guide for the records was Brendan Quigley (@fleetwoodwack ), Crossword Setter Extraordinaire and member of the rather excellent Boston Typewriter Orchestra

Find Puzzles here https://www.brendanemmettquigley.com/

Emily Baldoni is a regular guest and it was a pleasure as always


If you fancy supporting the show, either leave us a review somewhere on Apple or Podchaser which would help enormously. Or just tell your friends!!

There is a Patreon as well https://www.patreon.com/tempfans


Jonathan is the genius behind our theme music and you can hear more of his stuff on his Bandcamp

Additional music in this episode by Blue Dot Sessions

All available under the following licenses:

Transcript

1

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Making a podcast is a right pain in the ass.

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I mean, it seems like a good idea when you start driven by the egos of people who think they've got something to say, something you might want to listen to, but the arrogance of it.

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And for what? Two more middle aged white men regurgitating half fast opinions about music on the margins of pop culture.

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Yeah, that's a gap that needs to be filled.

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Keep doing that.

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Why don't you? Well, I'm afraid we will keep doing it, and we hope, at the very least, that somebody out there is enjoying it.

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Let me at least try and make the case that what we're doing is unique or that we're somehow qualified.

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We're closing in on the end of our third season of Temporary Fandoms, a podcast that listens to complete discography in order to learn something about the artistic process and hopefully discover some great records along the way.

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We started life as a Facebook group, which now has over a thousand members and is still grinding away in the background.

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And over at Temp Fans Com, you'll find all the accumulated noise that has resulted from our efforts.

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And in the show notes, a link to a special Spotify playlist that cuts the chip together with the tunes.

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And it never ends if you don't believe me, keep listening.

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Because today we're taking a deep dive into the recordings of Brooklyn's A Racist.

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They're welcome to Temporary Fandoms.

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This is actually the second time we recorded this.

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All the really funny stuff I've said, I'm just not going to bother saying I get again.

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However, it's 40 degrees, it's really hot, it's the summer and I'm sweltering here.

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So I am an I'm Nick and rejoining us for this part.

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Last time you will have heard it would have been on back.

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You'll have also previously heard around pool boy.

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Boy, boy and love it's.

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Emily Baldoni.

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Hello there.

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And I'm coming to you from my grandmother's basement in Phoenix, Central Illinois.

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Thank you.

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So it really looks like just a picture.

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A grandmother's basement in the Midwest.

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And it looks exactly like that.

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It's awesome.

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Also, Emily, while you were driving out to Illinois through the cornfields, what did you listen to? As a matter of fact, I listened to, like, four episodes of the Temporary Fandoms Pad.

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It helped me not fall asleep at all driving across the cornfields.

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It led me to we aspire.

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Yeah, basically, as long as I don't send people to sleep, that's pretty much what I'm hoping for.

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Rejoining us the last time you will have heard him will have been on the Bot whole Surface episode way back in season one.

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He was also on the Mercury Prize episode.

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He is a full a major crossword puzzle setter.

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You'll have found his stuff in things such as The New York Times.

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It's Brendan quickly.

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Hello, Brendan.

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Hey, Juan.

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Well, you Brits column setters, but in the States, we're called constructors, but that's just, like splitting Harris.

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But anyway, happy to be here again.

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It's good to see your faces.

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I'm splitting hairs.

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And now I think that's a puzzle.

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Am I going to spend this entire thing thinking splitting hairs? What does that mean? Hair.

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That's an anagram because of splitting Shi.

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Shi is the answer.

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She man.

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Welcome to my life.

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This is what I do all the time.

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It's like, kind of a borderline mental illness of just, like, hearing, like, disembodied phrases and, like, can I do make a puzzle out of that and got it.

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Just lock me up in the room and throw away the room.

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Right.

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Okay.

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Thank you for going back.

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And you are going to be guiding us through somebody.

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And that is it's.

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The rap group Death Racist, and they were an underground band from where else? Brooklyn, New York, in the early tens, right? Was it the early ten? Yeah.

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And we're doing three albums of theirs.

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Well, two mixtapes in an album.

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It's shut up, dude.

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Sit down, man, and relax.

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And I think that's right.

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I mean, we could do others, right? I mean, I mean, his expression, like, keep talking.

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And also, there's probably a couple of spin offs we might address at the end.

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Probably the most famous will have been Sweat Shop Boys featuring that is at.

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Yeah, I think so.

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Yeah.

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I'm really sorry if you do actually listen to this that I pronounce your name wrong.

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The entire afternoon I've been trying to pronounce well, words correctly for this podcast, so if I'm slipping up at this point, let's just go with it anyway, starting to ramble.

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So we are going to hand you over to Brandon, who is going to take you through the albums.

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in the song Rooftop Off Desk Racist 2010 mixtape Sit down, Man.

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The rapper Hems describe their act as follows, Death Racist is an end to mind wash.

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Religion, nowhere.

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Politics, bogus philosophies.

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Probably possibly a mockery of monarchy.

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I'm complex like Corneas duopoly quantities.

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Are they for real? Did he really name Check and obscure French mathematician? You bet he did.

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But that's not all they name check.

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It's as if the entirety of Wikipedia was fair game to pilfer and make fun of.

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In the same song, the other rapper, Cool Ad, drops the completely uncommon plastic surgery blepharoplasty like, it's something we've all heard of.

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They simultaneously come across as the best rap act ever, as well as a bunch of pot heads making each other laugh.

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Are they serious? And they answer that question in the most as racist way possible.

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Quote, We're not joking.

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Just joking.

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We are joking.

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Just joking.

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We're not joking.

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The story is familiar.

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A couple of guys meet up at College.

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They're too smart to be in a band, but they decide to form one anyway.

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Himanshu, Hems Suri and Victor Cool Ad Vasquez met at Wesleyan University students of Color for Social Change dorm where ad was Hems RA.

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After relocating to Brooklyn, they brought on a Hype Man, a choke Kondabolu who went by the honorable Profit DAP.

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Well, they took their name from the Wonder shows and meme of the Little boy exaggeratedly seeing that's racist, according to their booking agent, Dr described themselves as a white guilt art project.

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Science experiment, Panza scheme.

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Yes, that all checks out.

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After coming to attention with a meme hit in 2008, they surprised everybody by putting out two mixtapes, both in 2010, full of proper songs.

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Shut Up Dude and Sit Down Man.

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2011 saw them drop their only proper album, Relax, and then the wheels came off.

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Chances are if you've only heard one Desk Racist song, it's tracked three on the mixtape Shut Up Dude called Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell, a viral meme head from 2008 that framed the act as some sort of a tech in Chang electro thing.

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It was Polarizing.

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Either you were on board with their sheer so stupid at smart brilliance, or you couldn't believe that this was even a thing because, of course, stupid shit like this is a thing on the Internet.

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The rapper Hems was quoted in The Village Voice saying, I hope we're known solely for this song and none of the others.

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He probably got his wish, which is a bit of a tragedy because yeah, there's a lot of Stoner humor in there UVA, but there's also a fuck ton of so stupid.

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Wait, it's not stupid at all.

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Actually, it's really smart.

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Brilliant as well.

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What do you do with a degree from Wesleyan? Obviously, you start at Def Jucks worshipping rap act and show off all your vast literary, academic, highbrow lowbrow cultural references, an indent ciphers.

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Internal rhyme schemes are a must, and you bet it's political too.

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You can't really call yourself death racist to not talk about race.

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It's never preachy, though, just sharp satire, loads of it, and eternally quotable.

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This mixtape was released as a free download on March 29 2010 on his own record label, Greed Head, a project entirely funded by a severance package he got from a Wall Street job.

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release.

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The Scan six months after their first mixtape, Sit Down Man, is pretty much more of the same affair.

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Look, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

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And if the other mix tape wasn't long enough, here's another hour.

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Plus, once again, it is best enjoyed.

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With the finger hovering over the skip button.

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One really can't help but wonder what might have been if they had just whittled down both mixtapes into one tight 45 to 50 minutes collection.

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But seeing as Desk Races was imploding as fast as they were blowing up, surprise, surprise.

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Frictions arose from the nonstop touring.

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Maybe this was okay then, as we now have more of them to love.

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This tape has some outside production for the first time, including contributions from Diplo Chairlift and others.

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It also has Guest versus two LP shows up, and so does Rock Marciano, a couple other the names that nobody's ever heard of.

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Hell.

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Their Hype Man DAPs only vocal contribution to the entire project is here on the track Sit Down, People.

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Response to the album was euphoric.

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Critics and blogs raved about it.

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And while I enjoyed this one, I got the impression the public reaction was more of an overcorrection, having more or less ignored their superior debut.

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It was only a matter of time the Death Racist would be snatched up by a yeah, it says Greed Head in the spot where the record label goes.

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But truth was 2011 album Relax achieved actual commercial cloud, at least partially due to a Sony distribution deal.

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For a brief moment, Death Racist had a true taste of Fame.

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Relaxed peaked at number eleven on the Billboard album charts.

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They saw a girl appeared in an ad for Target.

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They had a completely preposterous appearance on Conan O'Brien, and there was a cover story of them on Spin magazine.

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But in true Das Races fashion, everything was part serious and part comedy.

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In regards to becoming more financially able, hems joke that he wanted to start dressing more like a British colonialist in a red coat and maybe lighten his skin with that money.

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Now, if you've only heard two Das Races songs, chances are the other one is called Michael Jackson.

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It's Bone Head chorus goes Michael Jackson $1 million.

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You Feel Me holler.

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That sure sounds like placeholder lyrics to me, but no, it actually appeared in a pre Death Racist song by Cool ad called Zebra, alongside the chorus for combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell as well.

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Apparently it's a finished product.

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Relax also contains a retread of Rainbow in the Dark, a standout song from the first mixtape.

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So you must wonder if there was just nothing left in the tank for this one.

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Then on the other hand, they dropped some incredible songs, like the title track, plus the missing title track from Shut Up Man and Punjabi song, which makes you think otherwise.

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So again, the good stuff is good.

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It's still a bit too long, though beloved critic Robert Crisco claimed this was the album of the year for 2011.

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Your mileage may vary.

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They're welcome back to Temporary Fandoms, The As Racist episode.

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And if like me, you read as Racist as like a boot, you're wrong.

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We have discovered that it's more Brendan.

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It's not like as as in Dash Foods.

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It's it's like Death is.

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It like a slurred death.

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You know, they took their name from the Wonder chosen meme of the little boy exaggeratedly saying that's racist.

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And they just thought it was really funny and said, you know, well, that's the name of our group.

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Yeah, I always just assumed that's what I meant how Americans pronounce staff.

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So I'm gonna watch a boot rather than as an.

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But I also think they were well aware of the way it works the other way as well, to the extent that you sometimes their name written in a kind of Germanic font.

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I mean, you're really going for the whole Das boot thing if you do that.

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Oh, yeah.

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I mean, I think they were definitely thinking of Maximum Shock, but maximum tongue in cheek as well.

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Yeah, I've got an image of a maximum a big tongue in cheek.

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Now anyone can see that too far.

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So we're gonna start.

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Brenda, we've already looked at how we've already talked about how it's probably the early teens where they came out and they came out of Brooklyn.

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What was happening? Who are their peers at the time? How did they come about? I mean, it was mixtapes at first, right? What was going on? So I think what was happening really, at least from my perspective, when I sort of stumbled upon these guys, it seemed like a lot of, like, rap backs are ignoring putting out records and just sort of, like putting their albums on tumblers and downloadable sites like that.

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I mean, I think back, like, the early ten, Odd Future, like, they put out so much stuff.

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And now I think Odd Future is probably definitely must avoid music.

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But at the time, it seemed like really fresh and exciting, certainly, like Earl Sweatshirt and things like that.

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So I think it was around them, and I can't remember which came first, but certainly Death Racist was one of them.

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We had Mr.

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Motherfucking exquire the Run the Jewels came out a little bit later.

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Danny Brown was another one, and it just seemed like a really fresh and exciting time of people sort of saying, like, you know what? We're just going to throw everything up against the wall, just see what sticks and not really worry about anything like commercial.

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I mean, some of the stuff was very commercial, but some of it was just sort of goofing around and and having to laugh and, you know, just sort of trying to get a name made for themselves.

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And so it seems like a really fresh and exciting time because there were no rules.

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It felt like the Wild West.

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And yeah, I think Death Rate is certainly, like, for me, kind of made an impression through humor.

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I mean, a lot of these acts were very funny, certainly all of them.

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But, I mean, you don't listen to, like, Run the Jewels and go, oh, yeah, that's like a funny act.

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I mean, there's a lot of funny lines in there or, you know, like, the shock, horror, Wutang Neptunes thing that Future was doing was also really funny, but it didn't immediately come across as, like, funny.

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Whereas, like, Death Racist, the names funny.

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I mean, they hit the mixtapes are funny as hell.

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And then, of course, the first song and probably the only song that most people have ever heard of by Death Racist is Combination Pizza Height and Taco Bell, which was which is 2008.

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I think that was the first thing that came out.

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So that sort of precursor because of everything else.

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And when I can get it before, obviously, before they came across the pond to my ears.

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I mean, that was massive, right? That's what sort of got everyone's attention before the mixtapes this came out became a meme before they were they know, exactly.

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And I think that they sort of took that they played that to their advantage of sort of, like, sort of thinking in a meme way, a lot of the videos that they made, like, especially like, Who's that Brown and maybe later on, a little bit, Michael Jackson.

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You know, these are like, really high concept, funny treatments that you didn't just want to watch and watch again, but you had to share it with other people.

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So I think they kind of sort of glom on to that.

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I mean, that came out in 2008.

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There were two guys went to Wesleyan University, move to New York for the band.

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Yeah.

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They met at the Wesleyan Universities, students of Color for social justice dorm, where one of the rappers, Cool Ad, was the RA resident assistant for them.

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And they struck a friendship there.

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And then it was later.

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Cool Idea is originally from Oakland, and Himanshu was from Wins, I think.

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But then they moved over to Brooklyn and they tapped their he's a high school friend, a Choke Kondabolu, who was the younger brother, the stand up comic Harry Kendal.

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And they brought him as a Hype man.

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And then that was it.

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Then they just started doing shows.

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And like I said, you know, I'm going to like me from there.

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And that's it like looking at, say, the first mixtape that came up, which was Shut Up Dude, which included Combination Pets, Hurt and Tagger Bell.

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I mean, listening to some of the stuff on there when I first heard it, the one thing it reminded me of was if you remember Edan.

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Yeah.

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Usually I'm the big primitive.

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Plus, I mean, there's one track and I know it's going on the Easy Food Motive.

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There's one track where it basically just wraps a bit of food, sandwiches and delicious stuff.

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And he just obviously he's playing with the Ribes.

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He's playing with the words remember my wife walking and going, is he just talking about pastrami sandwiches? I'm like, yeah, yeah, it's brilliant.

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And then when I heard Shade for the first time and this Rifle takes on obviously fast food pop culture as well as intelligent, really intelligent lyrics coming in, but don't they sort of really sarcastic.

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I can't be bothered, but can be bothered.

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I think they thread a real thin line between high art and low brow and not only in terms of, like, really complicated internal rhyme schemes, but also you know, Rhyming a word with itself, for example.

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You know, like, the best rapper is be real.

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Come on, jokes.

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It's us.

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Come on, be real.

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It's the same word, but it isn't the same word.

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And it has another meaning.

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And, you know, it's almost it almost feels like you're hanging out with somebody.

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And they're just like, trying to be the funniest motherfuckers on the planet.

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And then the other guys like, yeah, hold my beer and I'm going to be even funnier than you.

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And then the other guys like, no, I got to dance around a little bit and they're like, sit down, man.

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And then they do it again.

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And it's just yeah, it felt like the Beastie Boys.

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Like, the first time I heard it, I was like, these guys are going to be gigantic.

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You know, the first mix tape, I just was like, Holy shit.

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This is what we need.

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This seems like.

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And then whatever.

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I think that I'll move to Emily in a second, if that's okay.

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But I think for me and this sounds like a weird reference point.

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I'm not talking about the ability to wrap.

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I'm talking about the choice of things to wrap about is for late 80s, early 90s.

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Uk band Pop Will Eat itself decided they wanted to start wrapping.

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And they were certainly they were like a bedroom.

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Beastie Boys rapping about Watchmen comics and Big Mac and drinking does come in the score, man.

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Exactly.

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I got a lot of that vibe in terms of no one else is rapping about this sort of shit when I heard the first one, Emily, in terms of this style of music, first of all, is this your style of music? I know you quite like a punk her sound at times.

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And also when were you aware of them at this point? I think I was aware of, like, the combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell was when it came out, but I think I didn't actually listen to you.

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I didn't listen to the first couple of mixtapes until a few years later.

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I like a lot of hip hop, but I think this came out at a time when I just wasn't you kind of go through different periods where you're listening to more or less of different types of things.

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I just wasn't paying a lot of attention to new stuff that was going on in, like, American hip hop at that time.

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So I actually came I came to this a little bit later.

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And maybe I was actually even though I was aware of combination plot and talk about, I think it wasn't over exposed for me in a way that I think could be detrimental to somebody getting into it.

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So I really like the first mixtape a lot, and I really like that.

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I like the playfulness of it a lot is it just sounds like they're having a great time.

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And it just sounds sort of like effortless, even though a lot of it is I think that's sort of like the magic trick that they pull on these first two mixtapes in particular.

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They're really doing quite complicated stuff at many points, but it just sounds it sounds totally effortless to the point where I think it's really easy to kind of underestimate the complexity of what's going on and also just like the contract, because sometimes it's quite complex and sometimes it's really quite not complex.

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Like, what is it? Is it on Chances at the name of the tracker? I think they've got all of these.

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It's one of the most, like at certain points, lyrically dense tracks have got these crazy bits where there's just a million different references.

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Like, you have to, like, pause it almost to keep track of what's going on.

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And then the next line, he'll end it with something like drinking beer, drinking beer, probably drinking some more beer, which is not.

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And I think that's, like part of the hero to is that they're just kind of refusing to settle into to just one register.

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A quick question.

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I mean, it is the same at many Emily and Brendan, because growing up in the UK, we have this horrible his history and tradition of novelty singles now get released now.

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Get to number one, Morris Minor and the Majors, Stutter Rap, Star Trekking, Doctor in the TARDIS, the Mr Floppy song.

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I mean, there's a horrendous thing that are released as comedy comedy single.

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Some people buy them.

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If Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell had come out in the UK, I think it would have been seen as a novelty singly.

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I would have been boxed into that.

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Do you get that in the US or not present? No, not so much.

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However, I think if Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell had come out today on TikTok, it would be a number one single because you look at, like Old Town Road that blew up entirely because of Tick Tock.

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And it was sort of.

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I mean, it has a toe in the novelty pool.

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It's not a straight up novelty comedy song.

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I know those songs you and My Wife's from or Old York.

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So I know some of these songs remember, You're a Womble.

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I know that a classic.

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So, you know, we don't have that.

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But it's mostly because I think the charts are dictated by record sales, streams, YouTube streams and then the Illuminati.

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So whereas I think in England, it's like straight up, like, however many records you saw, how do you explain number one song and a truly terrible Iron Maiden number one song, except convincing all their fans to bring your daughter to the slaughter? So, you know, yeah, I think if you go back and look at the history of British number one singles, people might assume it's all, oh, Merry Christmas.

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And it's a good Christmas and having a good Christmas.

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Oh, no, there's some truly awful novelty records in there that you just question.

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So they saw the light of day and what I think because of that, it's easier to get a number one.

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I mean, get a novelty number one because you just hit the right guys, then people are like, Rage Against the Machine did it.

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Yeah.

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In the Rage Against Machine did it in the UK because basically everyone went, we don't want X Factor to have a number one.

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And Rage Against the Machine went all right by as and Killing in the name of got to number one at Christmas 15 to 20 years after it was originally released.

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Yeah.

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There you go.

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So anyway, point stands, I think if that sun came out today on TikTok, it would be ahead when you said no, I just say, like, a lot of our entirely imaginary listeners are old farts like me.

285

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So I'm just going to ask it, what the fuck is a mixtape? Yeah, I think we tried to discuss that, and I guess we concluded a mixtape is something you give away for free and it may not have, you know, I might use already source or uncleared samples, that sort of thing.

286

::

Whereas, like, a record is something a little more punished, you know, what is it? Shut up.

287

::

Do they use, you know, the uncleared Jewel Santana sample literally just wait to get ready and stuff like that.

288

::

So go ahead.

289

::

It's literally just a way to get around sample clearances.

290

::

Yeah, probably.

291

::

I mean, also, it's free distribution as well.

292

::

You and take this in.

293

::

I'm not lucky.

294

::

It's just, you know, that I'm just trying to understand or get my head around.

295

::

Well, the difference is, if you say this is a mix tape, this is an album.

296

::

What are the key features that make them different things? Money.

297

::

It is money.

298

::

It was painful.

299

::

And I think what sort of what kind of I think was sort of was lost in a lot of these, like, acts? What I was saying before, like Danny Brown or Tyler the creator and stuff like that, when they just sort of gave away their stuff for free, it immediately devalued it.

300

::

Right.

301

::

So when it came to a point where they're like, okay, now you need to pay for this.

302

::

And it's not to say that they didn't make I'm sure they've made money, and I'm not worried about them.

303

::

I think they all have careers.

304

::

They're not on food stamps or anything like that.

305

::

But it does immediately devalue music.

306

::

I think when you give it away for free and then expect money later on.

307

::

Now, at the same token, I don't remember the last record I bought.

308

::

I used to buy a ridiculous amount of records, but that was back when if you needed a song before, talk about old farts before, like, file sharing.

309

::

So whereas now, I mean, Spotify couldn't get my credit card fast enough when I saw it because I'm like, oh, this is going to be so much easier to just type out something instead of having to scatter the dark web into some scary Russian website download.

310

::

Christ knows what else, as well as the new goonsack record or something.

311

::

I could just, like, listen to it on Spotify.

312

::

So I think, you know, music is already devalued, so it's like, I don't know.

313

::

It's like, which came first, the chicken or the egg.

314

::

When did music get devalued it? Probably people would say it got devalue.

315

::

The second it was recorded, the beetles ruined it by recording everything piecemeal instead of live to tape with one mic in the room.

316

::

I don't know.

317

::

I mean, I think there was that, but I think it's when it hit things like the mainstream.

318

::

So even Napster, even when Napster was there, and then Kazar, or whichever one people used, it was still a minority of people who used it, but it was enough to make a huge splash.

319

::

I mean, you made out by myself, suing members of my family would still be buying record CDs because the idea of going on to a file sharing, but most people are still quite scary.

320

::

And CD sales were still very, very good at the time.

321

::

But once and then itunes came along and you can just buy one song.

322

::

You don't need to buy the album and hate the rest.

323

::

Just buy one song.

324

::

So people got used to just piecemeal, but paying for what they liked, the SPIF I turned up and everybody went, what? This is legitimate because there's still people who I don't want to download file.

325

::

I can't load on MP three or a record second.

326

::

If turned up, people got used to it.

327

::

I've seen very good friends of mine go mental gymnastics trying to justify why not paying for music is better.

328

::

And in the end, I'm just thinking, yeah, you're just trying to justify why you don't want to pay for music.

329

::

Frankly, sorry, but, you know, sort of bring it back to, like, death, racist or something like that.

330

::

Like in a way, like now that we just have, like, the universe of music at our fingertips, you lose that sort of like hunting.

331

::

That sort of went along with record consumption before of, like, sort of discovery, picking up the tactile, the record.

332

::

You're looking at the part you're trying to figure out, like, what records should I buy? Finding out information.

333

::

But we have all of this information at our fingertips now, in a way, the mixtape was sort of like, or even file.

334

::

The file was still in that record hunting in that universe where you had to figure out how to get you.

335

::

Where do I get this thing? I need to do a little bit of research.

336

::

I need to discover, discover.

337

::

Nowadays, you can just put on, you know, whatever, like the streaming side of your selection.

338

::

And once the record is done, they're gonna be like, here's a bunch of other stuff that sounds exactly like it.

339

::

And we're gonna do all the hard work for you.

340

::

So in some ways, like, the mix tape was was, like, the last bit of, like, kind of going out and searching for that record at me.

341

::

I don't know.

342

::

Maybe that's a little, like, never think you're right.

343

::

I think controls controlled distribution as well.

344

::

So it's a combination, obviously, getting around legal issues, getting it.

345

::

If you put a mistake in someone's hand and they like it, they go, Ah, I've got a thing someone else doesn't have.

346

::

I need to share the granted, these mix tapes became digital, and then they were just freely available anyway, right? Yeah, it did give them an Eagle a second.

347

::

You've got something you don't know about this, right? And I think everyone on this core, Nick Emony, probably agree that at some point in your pastor oh, my God.

348

::

You haven't heard of let me educate you.

349

::

Exactly.

350

::

But then I got a little Facebook group that lets us safely discharge that side of our personality and lead normal lives until we made a podcast out of it.

351

::

And now we're all fucked it.

352

::

Okay.

353

::

Let's talk about the this mixtape not the mixtape.

354

::

So we've obviously got a combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell, which after I discovered I found a million versions on YouTube of people re enacting it.

355

::

My favorite thing is immediately after combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell, a truck where two people cannot find each other at a AST food place.

356

::

You've got Rainbow in the Dark, and they start off with I'm a White House.

357

::

And then they rhyme chicken sandwiches with these kids.

358

::

I know.

359

::

Brilliant.

360

::

Fucking great.

361

::

Fucking great.

362

::

But also mentioning Rainbow in the dark, you.

363

::

And did you pick on the neutral milk hotel reference? Oh, yeah.

364

::

Jeff, mangled, I figured you want that one.

365

::

I was very happy with that one truck about people trying to find somewhere to go to the toilet.

366

::

Yeah, that's exactly where the line is.

367

::

Catch me at the crib getting light to Jeff Mangum, it's fun to do bad things.

368

::

Like rhyme about handguns.

369

::

Probably rhyme in an American accent.

370

::

I don't know.

371

::

It doesn't rhyme at all, but that's.

372

::

And then after that, which is this great dark laconic track, you go straighten to Fake Patois, which is it just hilarious.

373

::

The first time you hear Fake Patir as a track, it's just brilliant.

374

::

I'm pissing myself laughing.

375

::

I'm not even going to try and run the list of all the artists they point out to having these fake Jamaica and Patois.

376

::

And then you you been mentioned.

377

::

Who is that? Brown.

378

::

We got chicken meat.

379

::

Hugo Chavez.

380

::

basically.

381

::

Yeah.

382

::

I mean, I think that's we're done.

383

::

Let's go on to the next one.

384

::

I think there's a little I really like the first one.

385

::

A lot I do feel like there's a little bit more I'm not filler fillers a little too stronger than what I mean.

386

::

But I think there's some stuff towards the end that is not quite as tight.

387

::

It's definitely front heavy, for sure.

388

::

There's no question over an hour long, right? I mean, they're all like interminably long, do you think? Do you think? And this might be me reading too much into this.

389

::

I've often considered the death of the the long player format was not so much the death of vinyl, but the death of tape.

390

::

And because with a tape, you would listen to the first half on the way somewhere, and you physically were halfway through, you had to listen to the end unless you reround it or fast forward it to get back to the beginning.

391

::

A mixtape on cassette may have less filler at the end because people are going to listen all the way through it by default.

392

::

I see 45 minutes on the side.

393

::

And like the CD, I think it was like 70 minutes, right.

394

::

And we physically you were physically halfway through the tape.

395

::

It's not like with a CD, man.

396

::

The first one, you got your first Discman, then you pull it in every time you hit play.

397

::

It went to track one, right.

398

::

Whereas you came out of school, University work, whatever with a warning.

399

::

And you were halfway through, you know, you were physically here listening to the second half through.

400

::

I think people have stopped listening to the second half.

401

::

And so digital mixtapes may front load them because people's attention span these days is going to just we'll do the first bit.

402

::

I listen to that the first bit, and people rarely get to the end these days.

403

::

I mean, there's just so much music, right? I mean, you can there's just so much noise, there's so much content out there that you just have to I mean, everything's an elevator pitch.

404

::

Now you have exactly 1 second to nail it, and otherwise it's like moving on to the next thing.

405

::

Because what's the point? Like when you bought something, you felt like, okay, I've spent $15 on the CD.

406

::

I have a financial investment in this product, so I have to at least get my $15 out of it.

407

::

I don't know anybody shit.

408

::

I mean, actually, that's one of the songs.

409

::

I don't know anybody shit.

410

::

I don't owe nobody shit on this mixtape, but it's like it's up to the creator to blow you out of the water immediately.

411

::

Otherwise, what's the point? I mean, I look at this mixed name and it's funny.

412

::

So the song that everyone knows is at the three spot, right? But it has two phenomenal tracks ahead of it.

413

::

Who's that Brown.

414

::

And you ought to know.

415

::

And there with the Jewel Santana sample, I think it's Joel Santana, right? That they didn't.

416

::

He made the beat, I think.

417

::

But, yeah, where am I going with this rainbow the dark fake pad Swad nutmeg there with the ghost Face killer sample from Supreme Clientele.

418

::

Shorty said, That's funny as hell.

419

::

Chicken and meat.

420

::

So, like, the first eight are like fire.

421

::

I'd say, here's our stuff.

422

::

Listen to it if you've got time to listen to the rest.

423

::

Yeah.

424

::

And then the other thing is, I don't own nobody shit.

425

::

That's kind of stupid.

426

::

But actions.

427

::

We've already discussed the Hugo Chavez.

428

::

Yeah, those are great.

429

::

It definitely loses the plot shortly after that.

430

::

I think it's like around there where anything else, aside from combination pizza and Taco Bell, I feel like they have throughout these three releases.

431

::

They have songs where they're really wrapping.

432

::

And then there are songs where I don't know what the right term for it is.

433

::

Sort of.

434

::

I think I'm the most like the party songs where they're not really actually wrapping, very much like just hype.

435

::

It's three minutes of hype.

436

::

Yeah.

437

::

Koji at the City comes to mind, for example, which is a song that I kind of never need to.

438

::

I never really need to hear it again.

439

::

Yeah, there's a lot of those.

440

::

I feel like those tracks are cut for me.

441

::

Those are my lost favored tax, and they're kind of more highly concentrated towards the end of this one.

442

::

I do like that.

443

::

The last track on the mixtape is called Epass Shit.

444

::

You'll get it when you're high.

445

::

I don't remember anything else about the track.

446

::

Just the name.

447

::

The lock on Nick phase right now is the same.

448

::

Lookers, I just imagine.

449

::

I mean, I'm 46 is about my age.

450

::

Just to imagine 46 year old white males from England reading that guy.

451

::

What? What is this? What do I do understand? Okay, so probably a good time to move on.

452

::

We've talked a lot about the mistakes will stop.

453

::

But let's focus a little bit on sit down, man.

454

::

I would say that the lesson known of there, too, although they came out the right one after another.

455

::

I mean, it was like six months or something like that, right? I think it was even less than.

456

::

I mean, I certainly I'd heard of it.

457

::

And then they dropped the video for Who's that Brown.

458

::

And at the end they're like, hey, check it out.

459

::

We got another mix tape and you're like, Jesus Christ, guys, you've already put out 70 minutes of material we don't need anymore.

460

::

But.

461

::

But the answer was no.

462

::

Actually, we did need some more.

463

::

And that was the.

464

::

And that was a sit down, man.

465

::

Let's pull that one up for a second.

466

::

This one has the very laconic.

467

::

question.

468

::

Joking.

469

::

I'm joking.

470

::

I'm not joking.

471

::

I'm joking.

472

::

I'm not joking.

473

::

I'm joking.

474

::

Which is which is great.

475

::

It could sound awful, too, if you didn't appreciate what they were trying to do with it as you're playing with the genre.

476

::

But it's so fun.

477

::

I mean, it's attention at the heart of the band because it feels like that.

478

::

I don't know.

479

::

I think early on, they were mostly joking, but they were with serious things.

480

::

And then later on, they just didn't really seem to know whether they were joking or not anymore.

481

::

And that's getting a little bit ahead of ourselves to get onto the album release.

482

::

So I don't want to talk about that just yet, but I do feel like there was a at some point, there was an identity crisis in Das races.

483

::

And maybe when they wanted to be done seriously rather than this band of stoners.

484

::

And you can definitely hear that.

485

::

And by the way, speaking of, like, Stoners, can we just take a second to discuss, like, the sheer give a ship brilliance of the album covers of the two mixed States? Like, I think part of the reason I really dug at least the first team States was like, I recognize immediately myself in this.

486

::

I've sat on that shitty couch that they're sitting on on the first mix tape with my friends.

487

::

We're all holding a beer, maybe somebody's playing with a basketball and stuff, and we're just fucking busting each other's chops the whole time.

488

::

And it's like, yes, I know.

489

::

I know these guys because they're me and you listen to it.

490

::

You're like, yeah, this exactly.

491

::

And the same thing, like the sit down, man.

492

::

You know, again, I think, are they back on the same shitty couch? No, they're in a different couch.

493

::

It's actually been upgraded to a state money.

494

::

All that mixed state money.

495

::

It's now suddenly a leather catch with a passed out.

496

::

Yeah.

497

::

And who among us hasn't passed out on the couch before? Right.

498

::

So I have nothing to say.

499

::

How was the reception? I read a couple of interviews that sort of happened where people are like, well, how did you guys went to a nice University, end up doing rape? Like what? You want us to be uneducated or something? Like, they were sort of the reception was sort of you're a joke band.

500

::

You're not a joke band.

501

::

You're too smart for this.

502

::

And obviously they were second generation immigration, for example.

503

::

Hems.

504

::

I also want to say Hames, because that's how it be pronounced in Dutch for some reason.

505

::

Em to eat.

506

::

I know.

507

::

But when is the Dutch bit come in? You're not Dutch.

508

::

He's not Dutch.

509

::

How were they received? Does anybody know? Well, that that was the big problem.

510

::

How do you they're clearly a joke, but they're clearly not a joke.

511

::

And then when you're like, why are you guys serious? And then they suddenly were like, it became like performance.

512

::

Sorry.

513

::

All these interviews, like, they were interviewed by the time they had a cover in Spin magazine, and the whole thing was taken as seriously as, like any other bullshit session with your friends on the couch.

514

::

It was like they were sort of allergic to being a professional unit.

515

::

And I think that that's sort of what kind of is part of the charm, obviously, believe me, I think humor goes a long way for this, but it's also the frustrating end of it, because you sort of want to go, hey, guys, you really have something here.

516

::

You've got the total package.

517

::

Just give a shit a little bit, you know, like, they made some very professional and funny as hell videos, and they made some truly terrible videos.

518

::

They made some I look at, like, sit down, man.

519

::

Sit down, man.

520

::

Gets a lot more praise in the media.

521

::

And I think part of it was because everyone slept on it the first mix tape.

522

::

And they were like, these guys are a joke.

523

::

We can't take this seriously.

524

::

None of these songs are, you know, really all that special.

525

::

And it's mostly because they got butt her that they didn't really get in at the jump.

526

::

And so now we have Sit down, man.

527

::

It's obviously a little more professional.

528

::

You know, it's got chops.

529

::

Like, the first track is just them goofing around on the stretch and barbedo show.

530

::

So obviously they had, you know, props from the underground New York at that point.

531

::

And I think all the songs there's no other.

532

::

I think these are all the songs that either they did themselves beat wise or hire out people to do.

533

::

So I think in some ways, it felt a little more of a professional record.

534

::

And so I think the media sort of glommed onto it as a way to sort of talk about the other one, but sort of say, like, hey, these guys are doing something.

535

::

But for the heads who were there from the jump, I don't know many people who are there's some phenomenal songs on it.

536

::

Like I said a joking I'll put in all ten everything with someone with Lakotas is on it.

537

::

Is irresponsible.

538

::

Is it responsible? Yeah.

539

::

Irresponsible, like, one of the strongest tracks, top to bottom.

540

::

That's also got a terrible video, by the way.

541

::

So a lot of people loved it, but I think it was more of like, Oops, we missed about.

542

::

Do you think there's an element of a lot of time with bands? We signed bands.

543

::

The first album they've been working on for years.

544

::

It's a collection of the best shit they've done over a two, three year period, and they put it down, and then they get signed up and they've got to do it again, and they're writing us three weeks to do it.

545

::

Yeah.

546

::

No, I just think this is the same.

547

::

I think there is absolutely an element to this.

548

::

I do think that like I had mentioned earlier when I said that I feel like there was a sort of fear of success, right.

549

::

Part of the charm was to be irreverent and be professional, but also to, like, sort of like, we're going to going to take ourselves too seriously.

550

::

So I think that that kind of hindered themselves.

551

::

And I think that the same thing happened with these big types is that they probably I mean, some of these songs, like Combination Pizza Taco Bell and Michael Jackson Pre date.

552

::

I mean, go back to Wesleyan when Cooled did a song where it had all of these elements in it.

553

::

So this stuff has been lying around forever.

554

::

So, I mean, it's not like I think they were just sort of making it up.

555

::

I mean, they've been working on this forever.

556

::

So they probably had all this stuff in a can.

557

::

I mean, in some ways, what's great about technology being what it is today.

558

::

You can put out brilliant bedroom records.

559

::

You can put out, like, for a year, if you're like, a genius.

560

::

Right.

561

::

But the problem is that there's only so many people who put up that much material, and so they do need an editor.

562

::

So I do think that and that's not just a problem with races like that's, like with a lot of people.

563

::

I do think the mix type thing, this is when we chose what's on this.

564

::

So if it had come for an album and it'd be 45 minutes long, there's enough material on Sit Down, Man for a really good album.

565

::

As a mix tape, I kind of lose focus about, I don't know, halfway through.

566

::

So not much of the latter part of it really makes much impact on me.

567

::

And again, coming hot on the heels of one that starts off like Gangbusters eight songs right out the gate.

568

::

Awesome.

569

::

It does seem like a bit of a step down.

570

::

It does sort of feel like they run out of they're kind of running on empty, which was probably not the case.

571

::

It was probably like like I said, this stuff probably has been around and they just decided, like, alright, we'll put this one first and then we'll do this one next.

572

::

And I mean, I think they do understand intuitively how tough it is to promote yourself for free on the Internet nowadays.

573

::

Like, you have to basically always have content.

574

::

It doesn't matter how stupid it is, it's just you need to be part of the discussion.

575

::

Otherwise there's just no reason to keep going.

576

::

So you put out a mix tape, you put out a video, you put out anothe mix tape, you put on another video.

577

::

And so I think they instinctively knew to do that even when it really was the Wild West.

578

::

I mean, nowadays, like, you have that's the business model.

579

::

You just have to do it, you know, what the fuck a record? Who cares? You know, it's like, you got to put out a single and then a video and then you got to do a remix and that's single and do a video for that.

580

::

It's just like and then a tech talk.

581

::

And it's just like, you have to have something all the time.

582

::

So I think in some ways that they were in between the two eras, right? They do have to sell them oriented, but they knew you had to have content to be because they had combination Pizza attacker Bell blew up at 2008, 2009.

583

::

Right.

584

::

And then the new years before they finally put it all out.

585

::

But it's very short time between the first thing they put out in the last, like two mix States of both 2010 and then the one album is 2011.

586

::

So it all happen.

587

::

Let's move on to that.

588

::

Let's move onto the album and also try and talk about how the album sort of falls flat.

589

::

Brief aside, I saw Das Races by accident between the mix tapes and the album is a Primavera sound in Barcelona.

590

::

I think we'd watch something shit, like three boxes or something.

591

::

We're like, oh, what's on at this bit over there? Oh, that's racist.

592

::

No idea.

593

::

No idea.

594

::

Like, literally, it was words on a piece of paper.

595

::

And they were playing the little stage down by the water, right in the corner 01:00 in the morning.

596

::

And they were amazing.

597

::

They were chaos on stage.

598

::

I mean, I didn't know combination Pizza Hut and tackle Bell for me, Michael Jackson, which they played.

599

::

That was the big one that knew to shout in the shouting.

600

::

And then halfway through a track suddenly blaring over the speakers came Tina Turn and simply the best.

601

::

And they all fell to the floor, grabbing, holding.

602

::

There is screaming, screaming at the noise.

603

::

And all crawled off the stage.

604

::

And we'll there go.

605

::

Oh.

606

::

Oh, that's it.

607

::

Oh, that's the end.

608

::

Oh.

609

::

Okay.

610

::

I have I have no idea how to compete with this.

611

::

We're all waiting for them to come back, but Tina Turns just kept playing and they never came back.

612

::

And then we got back to the UK.

613

::

I found a mixed age.

614

::

I was like, this is brilliant.

615

::

And then the album came out not long after for me, and we're talking about run out team before and we're talking about needing an editor.

616

::

This feels like they got a deal and they were shit.

617

::

I suppose you better do something now.

618

::

It's turned into work.

619

::

Now it's not fun anymore.

620

::

Now, for me, the album sounds that's fun.

621

::

Yeah.

622

::

I tried really hard to like it on Jackson's.

623

::

Brilliant.

624

::

I like Michael Jackson because of the stupidity of just shouting out Michael Jackson.

625

::

A million dollars.

626

::

Yeah.

627

::

I need that to be on the big state.

628

::

It had just been one of many funnier sides on one of the mixtapes, but on the album, it's to highlight, you know, there isn't.

629

::

I don't know.

630

::

I don't really like this one at all.

631

::

I mean, there's really not much more to say about it.

632

::

I think.

633

::

I think you've really touched upon it.

634

::

It's that sort of.

635

::

I think it's tough when you sort of like find a band in the underground.

636

::

And we brought up you mentioned this earlier.

637

::

Ewen.

638

::

It's like you feel the need.

639

::

I have to share this with everybody.

640

::

This is, like, the greatest thing I have ever heard in my entire life.

641

::

And I need to share this with everybody.

642

::

And I think for me at least, certainly all the guys here are sports fans.

643

::

Emily watches the front.

644

::

So we're all sports fans here, right? And, you know, there's a bit of, like, cheering on a team when you sort of discover that the new band or the new act or whoever.

645

::

And I think the problem with Death Racist had was that I wanted them to be really big.

646

::

And I felt like they had the thing.

647

::

They could be really big, but they just flat out refuse to do it.

648

::

And part of it probably was like exhaustion, probably part of it was just like not having fun anymore because it does become a job and it loses that initial.

649

::

They lose the initial fund.

650

::

And I find that actually happens a lot with a lot of bands.

651

::

When you find them in the small in the nascent stages are like, Holy shit.

652

::

These guys are on to something.

653

::

And, you know, again, they're only playing like bars for their friends.

654

::

Like, they have a very small audience.

655

::

Maybe they're regionally famous.

656

::

And then, like a blog, like, picks up on them maybe or or something viral happens.

657

::

And you're like, these guys are the next big thing.

658

::

And so then they rise to the occasion.

659

::

But then, like you said, it becomes a job and it's a real Downer because it loses that charm.

660

::

You know, do you think you touched on the point about how as music fans, we discover things and we root for them? And then maybe when they become famous, we sort of stop rooting for them because they're famous, do you think? And this is forever? No, not necessarily.

661

::

That's not true.

662

::

And sometimes the paradox of, like, wanting them to be successful and I'm not it is in some ways, like, what's really appealing about a band, because sometimes, you know, I've got my voice in shirt on.

663

::

And I mean, like, I wanted them to be gigantic.

664

::

But the thing is that the thing that made them, like, successful, artistically to me was that there's no possible way in hell they could ever be gigantic.

665

::

They were a very small and and that was where in their charm line, so they could never have ever been a big thing.

666

::

And I think the thing with Death Racist is that they immediately had that glass ceiling placed over their head a with their name be with the fact that they couldn't take themselves seriously and see, well, I don't know how many hooks they really had.

667

::

I think, like when you go into, like, underground rap, like, you're only going to get if you get as big as, like, say, on a rake one or somebody like that, then you're like, alright, that's like, real.

668

::

That's like the big shit, right? But they're not going to be Drake.

669

::

They're never going to be, you know, anybody think about it.

670

::

So who's ever gonna most bands get into it.

671

::

Bands don't come and go.

672

::

We are going to be the next Arctic Monkeys, Queens of the Stone Age, whoever a big most of the time, they want to get to a certain level of stardom or success or artistic success or whatever.

673

::

And usually they're rooting for themselves as well.

674

::

There's sort of an element of this that feels that Das racists were rooting for themselves until they got the record deal, and then they were no longer rooting for themselves.

675

::

Emily, it almost kind of sounds to me like on this record, they've kind of lost interest, you know? They're not.

676

::

They said they're gonna do it, and they have the deal on this, so they're gonna do it, but they don't.

677

::

I mean, it just kind of led to me what was one of the most endearing things about the first couple Nick statements, especially the first one was, again, that's just sort of that effortless quality to it.

678

::

And somehow on this one, it just feels to me, it does not feel effortless.

679

::

It feels like like somehow they're trying really hard, but they don't really care.

680

::

So they're not actually that invested in the results.

681

::

I mean, with that said, I do think they're like, they're a good handful of tracks on this that that I think are quite good.

682

::

Like, I really like the title track, actually, the one that LP is on is really good, too.

683

::

That is that.

684

::

Shut up, man.

685

::

Like the Selena I like as well.

686

::

But there's just I feel like with all of these dust races problems, there's always, like, there's at least a handful of tracks that I think are really great.

687

::

And then there's a certain number that I find just really annoying.

688

::

I think the ratio of the second is bigger.

689

::

That I think of the selective, the selective output idea.

690

::

I mean, I mentioned earlier on Edan, and he don't basically have Primitive Plus and few EPS.

691

::

And then one album, Beauty and the Beat, which obviously took him a long time to put together.

692

::

And I think it's I think it's flawless from start to finish.

693

::

It's done nothing since it sort of mixed stuff and some Mixi peas.

694

::

But he hasn't released another thing since.

695

::

It was almost like, this is my best stuff.

696

::

I've been working on this for years.

697

::

It's yours now.

698

::

I'm out.

699

::

I've got nothing.

700

::

I got nothing.

701

::

You know, I'm kind of slightly tickled by the irony that the band that basically what we celebrate about them at their best, is that their stoners.

702

::

And then they get a record Bill, and we complain that it's half fast.

703

::

It's like, the wrong kind of half, as I know, exactly.

704

::

But that's the thing is like something I even like Michael Jackson.

705

::

I think when they actually wrap on that the verses are pretty good, but the chorus or it's a place holder, that's what it is.

706

::

I feel like it could be something better.

707

::

I don't know.

708

::

I don't quite know how to articulate.

709

::

Why? Because it is the Stoner thing is part of what is appealing about them.

710

::

But it's and it sort of ties into why these guys have never, like, be successful, because I think the appeal was that I can't even believe they're getting away with.

711

::

This was prevalent and certainly the first for one and a half mixtapes.

712

::

But by relax, it's Lag.

713

::

I mean, even the title says Leg.

714

::

Come on, just relax, everybody.

715

::

And we're like, no, you guys need to fucking step it up, man.

716

::

It's not it's not us.

717

::

It needs to relax.

718

::

You need to fucking spa out, right? That's what it is.

719

::

Yeah.

720

::

I don't know.

721

::

I mean, even when you watch, they were on Conan O'Brien at that time, and they do Michael Jackson.

722

::

And they brought in two auxiliary drummers.

723

::

They had a drummer with the full kit, and then two auxiliary drummers.

724

::

And Cool Ad is playing a keyboard.

725

::

And DAP Hype Man, who, by the way, can we just talk about let's talk about Hype Mending for a bit here.

726

::

Like, sure.

727

::

How do I get that job? I mean, this guy has absolutely what's the definite? What do we define as the Hype man? Are we talking Flavor Flavor or including Bed from the Happy or you got you got to include him.

728

::

Both those guys Bob from Pavement.

729

::

You got you got the dancer from the Mighty Mighty Bosstones.

730

::

What a job.

731

::

You basically interact with the crowd.

732

::

You have to have negligible musical talent.

733

::

And yet it's an instrumental piece in the band.

734

::

I think the way you get that job is number one, you're with the band from day one, and you have one of two things, the van or the drug connection.

735

::

If you're the one getting the drug, Stephen, is get to out the drug.

736

::

If you're the one driving them to the gigs, you can be the Hype man.

737

::

But, I mean, you think of, like, Flavor Flav.

738

::

He's probably the Paragon of that role.

739

::

A lot of contributions on all the records, a lot of vital contribution, I would say, you know, nine one one is a joke.

740

::

I think is one of their strongest songs, period.

741

::

And that's just Flavor just goofing around.

742

::

But going back to a racist, he did a 45 2nd rattling off of, like, famous people in circuit to 2010.

743

::

And that's it.

744

::

That was his entire contribution to this fact.

745

::

And yet he seems to be like a vital component.

746

::

I mean, he is in the dead center of all three record covers.

747

::

So they knew in some ways he's like the heart of the band.

748

::

And so going back to the video, I mean, he does the chorus and he's doing it from a pulpit.

749

::

And I can just imagine, like, if you had somehow never heard of this band, you have two reactions watching this video.

750

::

This is the most Brooklyn bullshit I've ever seen in my entire life.

751

::

Or Pass the Bog.

752

::

I mean, it was just it's completely insane.

753

::

It's like, so far beyond the pale of, like, comprehension.

754

::

Is that first life TV, right? This was I think it was, like, the only time.

755

::

Yeah, exactly.

756

::

And this is like, you have one chance to make an impression.

757

::

And the impression that they gave was like, we're not ready for prime time now.

758

::

In some ways, in some ways, that was their appeal.

759

::

I think that's again, what was really maddening about these guys, because you listen to it and you're like, this is fucking great.

760

::

It's so funny.

761

::

It's articulate.

762

::

I get it.

763

::

I'm with you.

764

::

I went to Liberal arts College as well, and I don't know what I'm doing with my degree.

765

::

You guys get it.

766

::

But then the other hand, you're like, how many cards had to flip in your direction to get on fucking television? And this is what you guys chose to do.

767

::

It's so baffling, I'm not even television code.

768

::

I know.

769

::

There's only, like, so many, you know, broadcast TV opportunities for a band of that stature to have been on.

770

::

And this is what you did with it.

771

::

It was.

772

::

But again, that was part of I think that was part of their appeal is that they just couldn't get it together.

773

::

I mean, like, I love Tina Turner, but they were definitely blasting Tina Turner at the end of that Primavera show as, like, a massive joke.

774

::

And you know what? It's stuck with you 20 years later or ten years later.

775

::

I can't do math on suddenly five.

776

::

Those are on me.

777

::

So, you know, another age they kind of remind me of probably around that time, too.

778

::

Or actually, maybe not now.

779

::

I think about it.

780

::

Maybe I'm getting old.

781

::

I'm getting my dates all mixed up.

782

::

Was like, Leave five, right? Like another Brooklyn band that had exactly zero signs.

783

::

There's nothing redeemable on on any of the records, I think.

784

::

But, like, live.

785

::

They were like, you had to see these guys because it was just fucking chaos for 45 minutes.

786

::

And the front guy, I've coopted his look now bald with a crazy beard.

787

::

But at the time seemed like this lunatic gym teacher.

788

::

And they were just playing the angular punk rock.

789

::

And it was just, you know, he was dressed up like a witch and he was riding a broom stick around the club.

790

::

Or he was like, building a wall, like the Pink Floyd on the front of the stage with all the boxes of empty beer bottles.

791

::

I mean, it was just chaos.

792

::

And you just felt like you needed to see this.

793

::

And I think I got that impression watching that thing with the Death Racist is that you just needed to see it.

794

::

And maybe if you were in the audience and you were a part of it, you're like, yeah, this is the shit.

795

::

But as a commercial entity, there's like, zero commercial potential there.

796

::

I don't want to turn this into a less 75 episode, but I just.

797

::

Oh, you do.

798

::

I saw your face.

799

::

You so do I saw the 75 in Boston around.

800

::

We were probably there.

801

::

2000, I don't know.

802

::

20, 10, 20, 12 ish.

803

::

And it was completely insane.

804

::

Like, he was coming out into the audience and grabbing people and singing into their faces, and it was terrifying and awesome.

805

::

Yeah, there's totally amazing life.

806

::

Okay, so we're not going to and there, but all gonna take a brief detail before we do end.

807

::

They split up.

808

::

Obviously they were having the phone anymore.

809

::

Cool ID and Teams, where there's separate ways.

810

::

And Hems, who was arguing the more talent is one.

811

::

I think he's the one that seemed to have a career afterwards, went off, did a few mistakes and eat pray, tug on his own before forming Sweatshop Boys with Riz MC, which would be the night.

812

::

And then also, I'm going to mention it, Call Ad has his own issues by issues, was accused by multiple people of sexual assault and gave the most shitty of apologies.

813

::

Like, well, you have your truth.

814

::

I'm like, is that the case? And he seemed to sort of totally dissociated, so associate himself.

815

::

This associate with is former best friend at that time.

816

::

What seems the better one musically? I mean, you seem to reject that, Brendan, when you insert it.

817

::

I think it's up for debate.

818

::

I think in a lot of ways, cool.

819

::

Ad probably had a lot more of the memorable lines for me throughout their discography.

820

::

But in terms of, like, where they went, I don't think there's much of a question.

821

::

Teams was definitely the visionary, at least on the business side of things.

822

::

I think he studied economics at Wesland, and in fact, the band was funded by a severance package from his Wall Street job.

823

::

And so, I mean, he even started a the own label, the Greed head, I think, which is probably again, cheekiness talking about whatever capitalism or something.

824

::

You know, I'm sure these guys are Marxist, but anyway, yeah, I don't know.

825

::

It's tough to say.

826

::

I mean, certainly the Sweatshop Boys is phenomenal.

827

::

But I think for me, when I listen to that one, it's Riz.

828

::

He's like, he was like a star from the jump, and he's someone who gets it right.

829

::

I haven't seen all these movies, but the Sound of Metal is a very powerful movie, and he just hits that out of the park.

830

::

And just to clarify, Riz M series is actor Rizwan Achmed.

831

::

Sound Of Metal Star Wars, four Lions, The Night Of major major, major Hollywood actor.

832

::

Now who I believe reached out to him because when here we're making the HBO series The Night of because he's supposed to be playing a Muslim New Yorker and wanted to reach out to a Muslim New Yorker and go, look, dude, what's your experience like how people do react to you? And I think that's how they first got together.

833

::

Yeah, it's funny because I recently watched that series and heard the album soon after.

834

::

I love that this album came out of making that show.

835

::

It's such a good album, I think.

836

::

And it's the album.

837

::

I mean, that Races probably couldn't have made this album, but it's to the album that maybe you wish that relax was because they were able to able to become serious, but without losing the humor.

838

::

There's still plenty of humor through Crash Mere, but it's so sharp is there is also a really nice contrast between the two styles because Riz is sort of spitting out for me, whereas Heme is still sort of.

839

::

It's almost like he is sort of like it seems to be the Ben Athlet to the Matt Damon one's focused doing stuff and one just taking the Oscar, but they're both contributing to Goodwill unto.

840

::

It almost sounds like he's slowed down, even walk.

841

::

Look at his delivery style.

842

::

I don't know.

843

::

It might be used to be the contrast to Risk because he's so rapid fire, but every time Hems would come on and this, I'd be like, Whoa, it's really is taking time.

844

::

That's not bad.

845

::

I don't mean that as a dish.

846

::

I actually I like this.

847

::

That would be the greatest disc in a round to ever, and you just take your time.

848

::

I mean, I should say to you, I like this album.

849

::

I don't like it as much as for me.

850

::

I just there's, like, joy that I get out of the first two mixtapes that I don't really get out of this in the production.

851

::

I think it's not always my favorite production feels a little cold on this, and I don't know, for some reason, I think it's grown on me as I giving them more listens, but at the first listen, at least I was not a big fan of Rises style, actually, and I don't know if it was like my ears were trained for a rapper who takes their time, but I found it, like drawing that the switch off between them the first few times I listened to this is just giving you whiplash a little bit.

852

::

So I think that's just a little bit of a barrier for me on this one.

853

::

Yeah, I think there is.

854

::

There is definitely a sort of British Asian London sound, and obviously there's the influences of things like jungle and drum and bass, etc coming through in his individual music.

855

::

I mean, you've got the Brooklyn Sardonic, sarcastic stoning a sound and then banging those two together.

856

::

It works.

857

::

I think it works.

858

::

It really works fine.

859

::

Yeah, I think the production is a lot better.

860

::

I do hear what you're saying.

861

::

There is definitely a lot of British I think crime was kind of dead in the water at that point, but I do feel like he had a little bit of that going on.

862

::

I was referencing that.

863

::

I mean, her props for a tiny 34 Minutes record.

864

::

Right? No less is more.

865

::

And that was maybe something that they learned over time, you know, just make it short and sweet.

866

::

But T five is obviously the highlight.

867

::

Five is great.

868

::

Yeah.

869

::

There's so many songs just about the difficulties of flying whilst Muslim because you got T five, you got no fly list, you got shoes off.

870

::

They're all about that same experience.

871

::

And there's a story I read once an article by I Roamed about that experience of being stopped at the airport and, you know, in a so called random check.

872

::

But, you know, because he's been in films as before, he was really famous, but he'd been in films like The Road to Guantanamo, which is sort of documentary, a documentary style film.

873

::

So for people with a little bit less nuance, that was like, well, you're that terrorist guy, right? Because you are in the road to Gwen Tanana.

874

::

It's ridiculous.

875

::

But I think it's that focus that I like about this album.

876

::

It's about something rather than about everything.

877

::

And maybe that racist was about everything in their lives, everything that that was a reference point to them, whereas this was this is generally about stuff.

878

::

It's about more important thing.

879

::

But, you know, I mean, that's a good point, because, like, when you're in your twenties, you think, like, everything that comes out of your mouth is like, God, right? God head.

880

::

It's just like, this is the most important thing I've ever said.

881

::

And everything that I'm into is, like, the most important thing ever.

882

::

And as you get older and a little more wiser people don't give a shit.

883

::

Right.

884

::

And so I think that that was so I think it's just like Switch Up Boys is an extension of just growing older and sort of understanding that, like, you know, just a little bit of self editing.

885

::

Never heard.

886

::

By the way, the band name is phenomenal.

887

::

I mean, I can't believe it's somebody that long to come up with that.

888

::

You know what? I'm slightly embarrassed.

889

::

I didn't pick up on it straight away.

890

::

I don't know.

891

::

I remember thinking it's a great name, but it just didn't sweat.

892

::

Your boys.

893

::

Petra Boys didn't occur to me.

894

::

I don't know why.

895

::

I don't know why.

896

::

I just didn't happen.

897

::

I think that's a perfect time to end.

898

::

We have looked at the The Rise and Rapid Fall and mix tapes and one album of Gas Racist and briefly looked at arguably more accomplished, if not less fun, Switch or Boys album.

899

::

We've also just basically talked about other shit and occasionally mentioned these records, which which also works for me.

900

::

Brandon, thank you ever so much for coming back on.

901

::

Hey, my pleasure.

902

::

Let's do it again.

903

::

In two years, right? Two years from now.

904

::

2023 caller or sorry as you were, I'm fighting back against sleep mods.

905

::

I L have the four.

906

::

I'm not a male model every.

907

::

Thank you for coming back and we'll see you on season four, right? Sure thing.

908

::

It's lovely to be here.

909

::

Thank you for adding it is now.

910

::

My computer is not saying it's 43 degrees and I really need to get out of this room.

911

::

Nick, alright, cheers.

912

::

Here we are, a podcaster, Miss Complete Discoveries, and today we chose an artist for released only one album, and the consensus seems to be that it's a bit shit.

913

::

So why did we bother? Well, hopefully the mixtapes painted a different picture.

914

::

A shut up, dude and sit down, man.

915

::

Both demonstrated a band that were well worth her scrutiny.

916

::

And if you're still not convinced, I'm willing to argue that cashmere by the Sweatshop Boys justified the whole endeavor.

917

::

You were listening to the highly regarded crossword compiler Brendan Quickly, who also plays for the Incomparable Boston Typewriter Orchestra.

918

::

Thank you, Brendan, for guiding us through the mixtapes and album.

919

::

And if you want more of his sweet tones, let me steer you to our long ago episode on the Butthole Surface.

920

::

We were also rejoined by Pod regular Emily Baldoni, who you've previously heard on episodes of Our Burk Love and Spoon.

921

::

Was this the first time you've let her loose on an artist with more than one syllable? Probably not.

922

::

Anyway, thanks, Emily.

923

::

And thank you to my Effusive Cohost Yuan for keeping the whole thing in motion from the discussions right through to the edit and to Jonathan Fisher for our theme tune.

924

::

Thank you for listening.

925

::

If you enjoy the show, let us know via review a few euros on Patreon.

926

::

Or just come and say Hello in the swamp.

927

::

That is social media.

928

::

We're always happy to hear from you.

929

::

And in the meantime, I hope we've helped you find some great records.

930

::

I'm Nick Hilditch Lie from the studio, breaking news for them because Rupe Trena fuck us and we're all buying a lube for him.

Show artwork for Temporary Fandoms

About the Podcast

Temporary Fandoms
Temporary Fandoms: The Music Discography Podcast
Temporary Fandoms is a place where we invite you to become a Temporary Fan of an artist, and hopefully some of you will find artists or bands you become long-term fans of. We are music fans, not gatekeepers, and all are welcome to become temporary fans.

Join us as we dive through the good, the bad and the what? Take your time and listen along. Feel free to pause us and go listen on Spotify or wherever to the albums. Or go to our Spotify playlist and listen to it that way.

To date Nick and Ewan have been joined by an ever growing roster of guests, who all have one thing in common; they want the chance to talk about artists that inspire passion in them. That's not to say this is a gushfest, there are plenty of dissenting opinions on the way.

We have been joined by John Tansey, Brendan Quigley, Aaron Troye-White, Zoƫ Von Hess, Cheri Amour, Fliss Kitson, John Henderson, Ben Zimmer, Christopher Whitby, Sara Marcus, Jeffrey Lewis, Jesse Jarnow, William Shunn, Emily Baldoni, Jeffrey McDonald, Nick Taylor, Glenn Hodgson, Lael Wageneck, Mike Plowman, Tansy McNally, Liam Molony, Gavin Hogg, Paul Hanley, James Kennedy, and Joe Mitchell.

And so far we have covered The Fall, David Bowie, The Pogues, Sleater Kinney, Butthole Surfers, Bjork, Can, Yo La Tengo,Richard Dawson, Spoon, Queens of the Stone Age, Future of the Left, Kyuss, Love, Number Girl, ESG, Neutral Milk Hotel, Mclusky, Das Racist, Hen Ogledd, The Sugarcubes
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About your hosts

Nick Hilditch

Profile picture for Nick Hilditch
Founder of the Temporary Fandoms Facebook group and co-host of the podcast, Nick is an animator and illustrator living in Budapest, Hungary. Unlike Ewan, he recognises the greatness of Tago Mago.

ewan swain

Profile picture for ewan swain
Co-host and editor of podcasts on the Tempfans network.
My opinions are often disputed.
Often correctly.